Alpine Garden Society

Now is the time to enter the Online Show

01386 554790
All topics Members' On-Line Discussion, All discussion threads for Any Other Topics

Any Other Topics: Cornucopia

To make contributions or to send emails to other contributors Login

Started by: Mel Linney

A forum for all manner of things

Go to latest contribution by Margaret Young, 08 July 2015, 20:58. Go to bottom of this page.

Long threads are now split into pages: Page 1 of 2:    (1)   2   next

Images on this page are shown as thumbnails. Click on an image to enlarge it.

Contribution from Mel Linney 08 February 2012, 14:31top / bottom of page

I have opened this forum to attract a diverse mix of topics, in other words The Horn of Plenty.

After throwing down the gauntlet in the excellent forum "Plants at Copton Ash, Kent" I thought I should practice what I preach. So to start things off with a few plants from my garden.

I have three raised beds, the first set of plants are growing in the wedge shaped bed, let's call it Wenslydale. The first one is Phlox douglasii 'Crackerjack'.

Armeria juniperfolia possibly Bevans Variety.

Sorry for the error that it is Viola jooi.

Hopefully this is Armeria juniperfolia.

Another Phlox this time, subulata 'Apple Blossom'

I think this is Saxifraga hirculus it must have come in on one of the plants.

That's all for now, please delight me with your pictures.

Contribution from Tim Ingram 10 February 2012, 11:14top / bottom of page

Mel - many thanks for your kind comments. Since I've shown many photos of our garden here are just a couple taken in a friends garden of narrow raised beds they have against their house (this is David Sayer's and Sylvie Buat-Menard's garden that I have put some pictures of elsewhere. They not only grow alpines but also collect rocks on their travels! Although I love plants individually, I also really like seeing them grown together like this...

Contribution from Mel Linney 20 February 2012, 08:18top / bottom of page

Thank you for your contribution Tim. As time goes by I am sure other members will be adding to this forum.Meanwhile I would like to share with you a few pictures from our stay in the Dolomites last June.

First up Thlaspi rotundifolium on the Scree at Boe above Corvara

Next, Saxifraga oppositifolia, still on the Boe.

Still on the Boe, I was informed that this was Ranunculus glacialis but my flora suggests R sequieri, any comments.

I am puzzled with this plant, my first thought was Achillea sp but I can't really pin it down. Again any help will be appreciated.

Contribution from Mel Linney 20 February 2012, 08:50top / bottom of page

Moving on to a wooded area just outside Colfosco we found Moneses uniflora.It's common name is One Flowered Wintergreen, which pretty descriptive but it has another, St Olaf's Candlestick which is more interesting. How did it come by this name?

Physoplexis comosa is a popular show plant and in a good year will get you a Farrer. We found this at the ruins of Castle Wolstein. What I like about this picture is the flying object making a Beeline for the flowers.

That's all for now, more soon.

Contribution from Cliff Booker 20 February 2012, 09:55top / bottom of page

Hi Mel,

Lovely images. Your ranunculus is R. seguieri.

Cheers,

Cliff

Contribution from Susan Read 21 February 2012, 14:23top / bottom of page

See the difference, both in flowers and rocks! The fasciation is not normal but I think not unusual. This picture was taken in Austria (the Oetztal mountains) last August.

Enjoyed your pictures...any more?

Contribution from Mel Linney 07 March 2012, 08:44top / bottom of page

Thanks for the confirmation Cliff, much appreciated.Susan, Iam glad you enjoyed my pictures and I will be adding more but first I must apologise for the delay in answering but Elaine and I have just arrived back from India.Among our other interests we enjoy Natural History so we went in search of the Tiger.We managed two sightings, one with its breakfast the other resting in the undergrowth. Then as we were heading out of Ranthambore National Park we spotted this magnificent animal ambling along the track we were travelling on. The driver and warden were so excited they reversed the Jeep without explaining what was happening which made us a little nervous but then realised that we were getting into position at a waterhole we had just passed in order to get pictures.

Thanks for the confirmation Cliff, much appreciated.Susan, Iam glad you enjoyed my pictures and I will be adding more but first I must apologise for the delay in answering but Elaine and I have just arrived back from India.Among our other interests we enjoy Natural History so we went in search of the Tiger.We managed two sightings, one with its breakfast the other resting in the undergrowth. Then as we were heading out of Ranthambore National Park we spotted this magnificent animal ambling along the track we were travelling on. The driver and warden were so excited they reversed the Jeep without explaining what was happening which made us a little nervous but then realised that we were getting into position at a waterhole we had just passed in order to get pictures.

The name, T39. Seven Years old Female and pregnant.

Back to the Dolomites, here are a few more plants from our visit last year.

Linaria alpina

Gentians verna

Potentilla nitida


Long threads are now split into pages: Page 1 of 2:    (1)   2   next


This discussion Thread: Cornucopia - To make contributions or to send emails to other contributors Login

Go to top of this page
Discussion Topic Any Other Topics
All topics Members' On-Line Discussion