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Corms and Tunics

CORM IMAGES      TUNIC IMAGES

CORM IMAGES

Crocus Corms and Tunics Crocus fleischeri corm: This species has tunics with interwoven fibres, which are the most netted in the genus and as such are a principal distinguishing feature

Crocus Corms and Tunics Crocus laevigatus corm: This species has a hard, coriaceous (eggshell like) corm tunic. The corms are distinctively shaped and relatively small. A thick hard tunic gives extra protection from drought.

Crocus Corms and Tunics Crocus hermoneus corm: A very large corm with parallel fibres, which are slightly netted at the top of the corm.

Crocus Corms and Tunics Crocus gilanicus corm: Example of a membranous or papery tunic and what might be thought of as a 'typical' corm shape. Thin tunics such as this often indicate species which come from relatively moist habitats.

Crocus Corms and Tunics Crocus abantensis corms: An example of reticulate (netted) corm tunic.

TUNIC IMAGES

Crocus Corms and Tunics Crocus biflorus tunics (wild): Coriaceous (eggshell-like) tunics which can split at the base. Basal rings (see below) are a feature of this species. Wild plants often have several years accumulation of tunics wrapped around them.

Crocus Corms and Tunics Crocus biflorus tunic basal rings

Crocus Corms and Tunics Crocus cancellatus tunics (wild): Netted tunics, which have accumulated around the corm over many years giving protection from extreme drought.

Crocus Corms and Tunics Crocus pallasii haussknechtii (wild): Fibrous tunics with extended neck. Many years accumulation of tunics around the bulb Indicate that this species comes from a semi-desert habitat.

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