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Plants in the Wild: Lundy/Braunton Burrows, early July 2010

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Started by: Kate Price

oh we do like to be beside the seaside

Go to latest contribution by Mel Linney, 16 August 2010, 08:50. Go to bottom of this page.

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Contribution from Kate Price 07 August 2010, 20:09top / bottom of page

On the east side of the island, the awful task of trying to clear Rhododendron, which has taken over the steep slopes. But just north of this (probably soul destroying) project, we find an abandoned quarry encircling a boggy area.

Drosera rotundifolia

and Pedicularis sylvatica.

How exciting.

We were generally lucky with the weather, but our final day on the island was spent in relentless rain.

Contribution from Mel Linney 08 August 2010, 08:37top / bottom of page

Thank you for that excellent report Kate, I particularly liked the Orchids especially Epipactis palustris.It shows the beauty that is on our own doorstep and the experience has encouraged me to visit that area in the near future.

Contribution from Kate Price 14 August 2010, 20:56top / bottom of page

Mel - many thanks for the feedback. Braunton Burrows is wonderful at any time of year. There's a marvellous book called 'Wild Flowers of Braunton Burrows' by Mary Breeds (2004), which explains the surprising range of habitats in the dune system, gives a comprehensive plant list and contains great photos taken by the author and her husband John. Late one summer a few years back I was lucky enough to meet John, who was the Ranger at the time, in one of the sand dune car parks. And what luck it was! I had been going round in circles all day searching, but he was able to lead me directly to the site of the fascinating Pyrola rotundifolia ssp maritima (round-leaved wintergreen), which has a symbiotic relationship with Salix repens (creeping willow) on the dunes. He also showed me the Spiranthes spiralis (autumn ladies tresses) and a giant green grasshopper!

Contribution from Colin Dolding 15 August 2010, 16:04top / bottom of page

Thank you Kate for a very interesting account of a rather special area. I think very few people realise the diversity of flora there. Have not been there for a long time.

Contribution from Mel Linney 16 August 2010, 08:50top / bottom of page

Thanks for the information about the book. I will be purchasing a copy ready for my visit. Nice to hear about the autumn ladies tresses. We have a small colony in South Yorkshire but I think you have to be blindfolded and spun round three times before seeing them.


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