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Plants in the Garden: June in the Garden

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Started by: Jon Evans

Go to latest contribution by Jon Evans, 18 July 2012, 09:55. Go to bottom of this page.

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Contribution from Jon Evans 10 July 2012, 22:13top / bottom of page
Carpobrotus edulis

The Hottentot Fig. This is the plant that is a dangerous invasive on parts of the Cornish coastline, but in a hanging basket it is quite well behaved and produces huge flowers.

Carpobrotus edulis
Linaria purpurea

Linaria purpurea is almost a weed here, but the pink form, commonly sold as Canon J Went, never seems to produce seedlings, so I was delighted to find this one in the front garden.

Linaria purpurea
Lychnis coronaria

Another cottage garden plant which tends to seed itself in the wrong place (I only have one plant this year, in the middle of the rock garden), but which I am fond of for the startling colour and the great contrast with its grey foliage.

Lychnis coronaria
Oenothera

I'm not sure which species this is - it is annual or biennial, but has been with me for several years (another stray seedling tolerated in the crevice garden). The flowers are pure primrose yellow when they open in the evening, but the following morning they have this interesting water-wash effect.

Oenothera
Papaver sp.

A largish poppy, 15in high, which I grew from AGS seed originally, but these 2nd generation seedlings have deserted their label.

Papaver sp.

I love the clean orange colour.

Potentilla recta

Another plant which maintains itself by seeding gently, here in yellow and primrose forms.

Potentilla recta
Roscoea humeana

An early, purple form.

Roscoea humeana
Saxifraga Hare Knoll Beauty

The silver saxifrages do really well in the crevice garden, and have started to self-seed. The progeny will probably all be hybrids, but I don't really mind; I much prefer it when plants propagate themselves like this. Note the tiny hunting wasp which is visiting the flowers, and hopefully pollinating them.

Saxifraga Hare Knoll Beauty
Senecio polyodon

This is a new plant for me this year, but I have been delighted with it - masses of small startlingly purple flowers.

Senecio polyodon
Triteleia Rudy

I find these do much better for me in the garden than they do in pots.

Triteleia Rudy
Tuberaria lignosa

Finally, a plant I have tried before several times, for the beauty of the flowers, but have always lost in the winter. Two years ago, Rachel Lever persuaded me to have another go with it, I planted it at the end of one of the crevices where it gets the best drainage, and it is still with me (touch wood). Rachel says it seeds around gently; I do hope so. The flowers are beautiful, but fleeting. I inspect it after breakfast each morning, and photograph it if it looks good; by lunchtime the petals have all fallen, even in still, warm weather.

Tuberaria lignosa

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