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Plants in the Garden: Flowering in March 2014

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Started by: Jon Evans

Go to latest contribution by Jon Evans, 26 May 2014, 14:04. Go to bottom of this page.

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Contribution from Jon Evans 26 May 2014, 14:04top / bottom of page

Having finally caught up with all my tasks associated with show photography, since it is pouring with rain here today, I thought I would try to post some pictures from my garden, and various outings, this spring.  Looking back, I found the last pictures I posted were in January, so there is plenty of ground to cover, and I'm going to start with some pictures I took at the beginning of March.

Galanthus Tiny Tim

This is one of my favourite snowdrops, tiny in both leaf and flower.  I have two clumps, which have built up over the years from bulbs given to me by Dick Bathe.  I keep meaning to split them up, but they die down early, and by this time of year, when it would be appropriate to dig them up and split up the clumps, I can no longer tell exactly where they are.

Galanthus Tiny Tim
Galanthus plicatus Sophie North

Another favourite snowdrop; this is one I grow in a pot.  Several years ago, I took a photo of a panful at the Early Spring Show, when Don Peace first won an award with it.  The photo was widely acclaimed, and did very well for me in competition.  When I gave Don a print of it, he kindly reciprocated by giving me a few bulbs in a pot, which are increasing slowly.

Galanthus plicatus Sophie North
Muscari

One of the things I accidentally let seed in my bulb frame a few years ago was some Muscari, and now the sand plunge, and several pots masquerading under a different name, have produced flowers like these.  I'm not sure of the species, possibly ex. forniculata.

Muscari
Colchicum hungaricum

I love the little colchicums, and this is one of the best.  I was delighted to have my few bulbs flower like this; but they don't seem to increase much, by seed or division.  I can only assume that it is possible to get plenty of seed set, and raise a large pan that way, since we regularly see pots with 50+ bulbs in on the show bench.

Colchicum hungaricum
Colchicum luteum

Another colchicum I have struggled with for a long time, and was delighted to have flowers on this year, for the first time for about four years.

Colchicum luteum
Fritillaria raddeana

This is a bulb I raised from seed, which took several years.  I had two bulbs, and was hoping to get more seed, but the other bulb rotted last winter; I think it must have got under a drip in the frame.

Fritillaria raddeana
Narcissus Candlepower

A lovely little white trumpet daffodil, which I always associate with Kath Dryden, because she used to grow and exhibit it, at a time when it was almost unobtainable.

Narcissus Candlepower
Narcissus WP Milner

Another old favourite, which I used to grow well, and then almost lost.  I have finally managed to get one bulb back to flowering size.

Narcissus WP Milner
Narcissus tazetta

I have grown this miniature form of N. tazetta for many years, but it seldom flowers.  I  have always put this down to a need for more summer heat, but since this spring flowering was the best ever, and last summer was hot only for a brief period whilst I was on holiday, something else must be the trigger.

Narcissus tazetta
Narcissus tazetta aureus

This yellow tazetta is similarly reluctant to flower for me, but looked lovely this year.

Narcissus tazetta aureus
Isopyrum thalictrioides

This is a plant I rescued from Joy Hulme's greenhouse, after she and her husband Jack had died.  I keep it in a shady frame, but wish I could work out how to grow it better.

Isopyrum thalictrioides
Scilla greilhuberi

This is another plant we see occasionally on the show bench, but it makes a great garden plant - my patch is about six feet across now.  I made a mental note this year to move some of them across the garden to plant next to Epimedium x perralchicum.  The two flower at exactly the same time and would make a great colour contrast.

Scilla greilhuberi
Corydalis solida Beth Evans

I think this soft pink form of Corydalis solida is my favourite (with the possible exception of the white, which I don't have).  I planted it in a shady bed about three years ago, but it seems to increase very slowly; perhaps there is too much competition there from epimediums etc.

Corydalis solida Beth Evans

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