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Display Gardens: AGS Garden, Pershore, in the winter

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Started by: Rick Lambert

Some very early flowering during December 2011

Go to latest contribution by Martin Rogerson, 20 December 2011, 11:40. Go to bottom of this page.

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Contribution from Rick Lambert 19 December 2011, 23:26top / bottom of page
Euryops acraeus

Perhaps the most visually stunning plant was the blue/silver foliage of Euryops acraeus growing in the crevice bed. This is a recent planting and I have found that the plant will spread underground, but it is not too invasive. The plant comes from South Africa and hangs onto to its foliage during the early winter. Outside its growth is more compact than in the alpine house. Best to have a few rooted cuttings.

Euryops acraeus
Erysimum caricum

This plant is one of the nicer introductions in recent years. This is growing in the Tufa Bed and doing something the Brassicaceae seem to do and that is where redundant flower stalks sprout growth identical to the main plant.

Erysimum caricum
Erysimum caricum
Erysimum caricum
Azorella lycopodioides

Another wonderful cushion growing in the Tufa Bed. I saw this growing in peaty, acidic volcanic snow melt in Patagonia where it is even more compact. A close inspection of the minute leaves shows it to be an Azorella, though is a range of 'geomorphs' that are equally as good.

Geomorph = Plants from different genus that adopt identical growth.

Azorella lycopodioides
Iberis pruttii

This Iberis is perhaps the earliest of the genus to flower and will gently seed itself and make these prostrate shrubs. At Pershore it grows in the crevice as well as in the Tufa

Iberis pruttii
Dianthus 'Eileen Lever'

This must be one of the best Dianthus introduction of recent years. Never thought of growing it in Tufa, but it looks very happy but one of its parents (D. erinaceus) loves Tufa. Make sure you keep a few cutting ready as it can flower itself to exhaustion. The other parent is D. haematocalyx.

Dianthus 'Eileen Lever'
Now some surprises

Primula vulgaris seeds itself around the shadier parts of the garden, and here it is in flower on December 14th.

Oops yes, that is a Dandylion.

Now some surprises
Gentiana acaulis

This species often repeat flowers in the summer and again in the autumn, but it was still a surprise to see an open bud.

Gentiana acaulis
Pulsatilla vulgaris 'Budapest Strain'

Now this I did not expect. Only sterile seed from this Pershore plant I understand. Various forms of it are in commerce.

Pulsatilla vulgaris 'Budapest Strain'
Edrianthus pumilio

Growing in a trough near the steps to the Alpine House

Edrianthus pumilio

Contribution from Rick Lambert 20 December 2011, 00:02top / bottom of page
Oxalis nahuelhappiensis

This Oxalis has only a slender hold on cultivation. Sets a little seed and the seedlings are best left where they are. It is delicate and pleasant with its pale yellow flowers and one of the better behaved members of the huge Genus.

Oxalis nahuelhappiensis
Oreostachys spinosa ?

I can only guess that this is a cristate form of this Crassulaceae. I did introduce it to the garden (again easy in Tufa) but not one like this.

Oreostachys spinosa ?

Contribution from Rick Lambert 20 December 2011, 00:16top / bottom of page
Saxifraga (probably) 'Silver cushion'

Showing reversions to the ordinary green mossy. This is growing happily in some shade. The Mossy group hate summer scorch.

Saxifraga  (probably) 'Silver cushion'
Saxifraga 'Coolock Kate'

Just one flower but still strange. There are several plants of this in the Tufa

Saxifraga 'Coolock Kate'
Saxifraga 'Odysseus'

S. 'Odysseus' is a cultivar of S. sancta, one of the good yellows. The mas shown here is in the crevice and recovering from summer scorching of aummer wet!. Amazing are the buds almost open. Many Saxifrage growers are reporting extensive late season flowerings.

Saxifraga 'Odysseus'

That should read' summer scorching or autumn wet.

Saxifraga boydii 'Sulphurea'

Again packed with flower buds. which generally don't like the winter cold.

Saxifraga boydii 'Sulphurea'

All this late season flowering makes me wonder what the spring flowering will be like. However it does underline that fact that Saxifraga of this section (Porphyrion) form their buds in the autumn and the value of proptecting the plants from autumn and winter wet.

Contribution from Martin Rogerson 20 December 2011, 11:40top / bottom of page

Thanks for a bit of seasonal cheer Rick. I find Orostachys spinosa rosettes often create the effect you show as they age. I've always assumed it was some form of fasciation caused by physical or insect damage, as the rosettes appear normal when young.



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