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AGS Shows: Loughborough Autumn Show 3rd October 2015

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Started by: Martin Rogerson

Go to latest contribution by Margaret Young, 17 October 2015, 14:37. Go to bottom of this page.

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Contribution from Jon Evans 06 October 2015, 19:00top / bottom of page
Tanacetum leontopodium

Exhibited by Alan Newton.  This had just made new leaves, which made quite a contrast against the older ones.

Tanacetum leontopodium
Campanula cashmeriana

This lovely Campanula exhibited by Brian Russ must flower in the autumn, for I have only ever seen it at autumn shows.

Campanula cashmeriana
Cyclamen graecum subsp graecum

This is the lovely deep pink form of C. graecum exhibited by Ian Robertson at the JRGC Alpine Day.

Cyclamen graecum subsp graecum
Cyclamen graecum subsp candicum

Again from Ian Robertson

Cyclamen graecum subsp candicum
Cyclamen graecum subsp candicum

The same species exhibited by Vic Aspland - quite different from the previous specimen.

Cyclamen graecum subsp candicum
Cyclamen hederifolium

A lovely deep pink form of C. hederifolium, reminiscent of Ruby Glow, exhibited by Tommy Anderson.

Cyclamen hederifolium
Vaccinium nummularia

Another plant in fruit, also from Vic Aspland

Vaccinium nummularia
Gladiolus carmineus

Another South African bulb, this time exhibited by Ivor Betteridge.  George Elder and I had a long discussion (without reaching a conclusion) about whether it was truely G. carmineus or a hybrid.  It is paler, and has more open flowers, than the forms common in cultivation.

Gladiolus carmineus
Cyclamen graecum subsp graecum

Another cyclamen curiosity exhibited by Vic Aspland.  This plant is a chimaera - a merging of two distinct genetic identities within the same tuber, probably created by some accident at seed formation. 

Cyclamen graecum subsp graecum
Cyclamen coum ex CSE 88397

A lovely and unusual leaf form of Cyclamen coum, from Ivor Betteridge.

Cyclamen coum ex CSE 88397
Ledebouria Gary Hammer

Another interesting leaf, this time on a Ledebouria, exhibited by Bob Worsley.

Ledebouria Gary Hammer
Dyckia fosteriana

Finally, an interesting plant I know nothing about, grown from seed by show secretary Neil Hubbard.

Dyckia fosteriana

I would like to thank the two show secretaries and their team for staging an excellent show, and not least for making sure I got some lunch, and copious tea.

This is the last show I am attending this year, so I probably won't have much to post until Caerleon.

Contribution from Margaret Young 07 October 2015, 19:30top / bottom of page

Thanks and congratulations to you, Jon, for a super season of show  pictures, not to mention your work with artistic displays. Thanks!

Contribution from Jon Evans 15 October 2015, 21:20top / bottom of page

Thank you Maggie.

I would like to clarify the remark I made which is (mis)reported in the official show report for this show.  I find that collar rot in November, post-flowering, is the main hazard with growing Lachenalia maughanii (not Brunsvigias). To combat this, the bulbs rest on the surface of a compost made up of two parts grit and one part John Innes no. 3, and are then encased in 3cms of coarse grit. Prompt, careful removal of the dying flowers is also necessary.

The Brunsvigia species I grow again with grit around the bulb, but with the neckof the bulb protruding from the surface of the grit, rather than buried.

Contribution from Margaret Young 16 October 2015, 20:32top / bottom of page

Jon,  do you remove just the petals of the dying flowers  (wishing for seed?) or do you feel the need to remove the whole flowering stem of the Lachenalia? (I don't grow any of the species so its a mystery to me!)

 

Contribution from Jon Evans 17 October 2015, 11:05top / bottom of page

Maggi

The petals make a tube which will pull off leaving a seed capsule.  Some members of th South African Bulb Group certainly manage to set and ripen seed, though I find this difficult in late October and November with a greenhouse on the north side of a hill, partly shaded by trees.  It is hard to remove more than that without shaking the gravel off and opening the plant rosette out.  If you look at the photo, you can see that the leaves make a funnel, which collects any water / condensation etc and directs it down where you don't want it, like Massonia only worse.  So the pots need to be somewhere dry and bright (again like Massonia), and no overhead watering, but I still find drips, and the clammy, steamy autumn air we seem to get can easily be the death of them.  But George Elder grows them perfectly well in a much damper climate in Cardiff, and I have never worked out what he does differently.

Contribution from Margaret Young 17 October 2015, 14:37top / bottom of page

Thanks Jon , I had a fleeting  vision of intricate surgery which I am glad to discover is quite uncalled for!   Some plants do seem determined to collect moisture and this is a real trial in damp old Britain. I sometimes wonder if the benefit for the gardener in being able to be in a glass house is completely negated by the need to have fans blasting to keep air moving.  

 


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