Alpine Garden Society



01386 554790
Back to List of Entries for Wisley's Alpine Diary

Go to bottom

You can add your comments on the content of this diary entry by starting a discussion, but you need to login first
Login

Wisley's Alpine Diary

This entry: 8 October 2009 by Paul Cumbleton

Log 58

Wisley's Alpine Log

By Paul Cumbleton

Log 58... 8 Oct 2009

With the trees already turning, autumn is bringing lots of colour to the garden.

In the Monocot Borders, which the alpine department tend too, this Cortaderia selloana ?Aureolineata? looks magnificent:

 

The leaves of this cultivar are also colourful:

In the same borders, the leaves of Imperata cylindrica ?Rubra? positively glow when backlit:

Autumn is also the time that Saxifraga fortunei flowers. This one is ?Rubrifolia?:

In a raised bed, Aster ericoides ?Prostratus? smothers itself with countless small daisies:

Here are the flowers in close up:

This Aster is very vigorous and all the growth you see has been made this year, the plant dying back to a central crown each year.

 

Indoors, there are still some late flowers and another very different Aster is A. coloradoensis:

There are also still lots of autumn-flowering Crocus. Here are several pots of C. goulimyi:

The ?Astra? series of Platycodon grandiflorus were developed as dwarf forms for pot work. We had grown the whites and purples before, but this year we also tried the pink form and it turns out to be quite an unusual shade of pink:

When grown in pots, these stay around 20 to 30cm tall.  We also have some planted out in the rock garden and we find that with a free root run they do grow taller, but never attaining the size of the normal forms. Finally, I can?t resist slipping in a picture of one of my Acer palmatum at home. These for me are the very essence of autumn:

Go to top
Back to List of Entries for Wisley's Alpine Diary

You can add your comments on the content of this diary entry by starting a discussion, but you need to login first
Login