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Kent Alpine Gardener's Diary

This entry: 03 February 2016 by Tim Ingram

A Tale of Two Trees.

A Tale of Two Trees

There comes a point when trees are just a little too big to deal with... This Metasequoia in the nursery area of the garden died a couple of years ago because of a series of very dry summers. Earlier in its life it had benefited from the regular watering of nursery plants around it but as it grew bigger the moisture demands increased disproportionately to the availability. Having reached to nearly half-way up with a ladder common sense overcame valour and we contacted a local tree surgeon to take it down carefully from the top.

The first day they came in late January turned out to be one of the windiest and wettest we have had since Christmas and so they returned today to complete the job. Extremely impressive to watch young professionals tackling a tree like this - we did remove the glass lights over the frames nearby but nothing was damaged in the surrounding area. A high level of skill.

The stump has been left as a seat in the nursery area and counting the rings the tree was planted some 27 years ago.

We also have an impressive specimen of Eucalyptus gunnii in the garden, grown from seed I was given in Tasmania from trees high on the Central Plateau. This was planted in the early 1980's as a small plant only around 50cm high. Fortunately the wind and rain didn't prohibit working on this and a number of the lower spreading branches have been removed, partly to open up the position of a fine Acer griseum nearby and partly to encourage clearing and replanting around the eucalypt and the garden beyond, which has become very overgrown.

 After removing the ivy from the trunk and beginning to tidy up beneath the full drama of the tree has been revealed again. This is accentuated because of having sown the seed and watch it grow over the past thirty plus years! The only downside is how much more clearing of brambles and nettles is necessary to bring this part of the garden back to life, but seeing the tree as it is now is highly invigorating.

The work was carried out by Henri Stevens - www.treefolk.co.uk - who I can highly recommend for anyone needing tree work done in Kent (especially because he suffered the setback of having all of his equipment stolen earlier in January, a frustration which we have had experience of too).

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